Lake County Illinois criminal defense

If you or a loved one is facing criminal charges, it is essential to have an experienced and dedicated criminal defense attorney on your side. I am writing to introduce myself and my law firm as a top-notch resource for those facing criminal charges.

As a highly skilled and experienced criminal defense lawyer, I understand that facing criminal charges can be a daunting and stressful experience. That’s why I am committed to providing my clients with the highest quality legal representation and advocacy, backed by extensive knowledge and experience in the field of criminal defense.

Whether you are facing charges for a minor crime or a serious offense, I will work tirelessly to ensure that your rights are protected and your case is handled with the utmost care and attention. I have a proven track record of success, having successfully represented clients in a wide range of criminal cases, from drug offenses and white-collar crimes to violent crimes and more.

If you or a loved one is in need of legal representation, I invite you to schedule a free consultation with me to discuss your case and learn more about how I can help. I am confident that I have the experience, knowledge, and commitment to help you achieve the best possible outcome in your case.

Thank you for considering my law firm for your legal needs. I look forward to the opportunity to serve you.

Sincerely,

Louis M. Pissios
Attorney and Counselor at Law
across the street from the courthouse
9 South County Street
Waukegan, Illinois 60085-5567
Practicing in Criminal Defense and Personal Injury
TELEPHONE (847) 263-0001

The difference between criminal law and civil law

Civil law and criminal law are two distinct areas of law that deal with different types of legal issues. Civil law is concerned with disputes between individuals or organizations, such as contract disputes or personal injury claims. Criminal law, on the other hand, deals with actions that are considered harmful to society as a whole and are prohibited by criminal statutes. Criminal law is concerned with punishing those who break the law and protecting society from criminal behavior. In a civil case, the goal is typically to compensate the victim and make them whole, while in a criminal case, the goal is to punish the offender and deter future criminal behavior.

Lake County Illinois

My practice is devoted almost entirely to representing and protecting the rights of individuals in a full range of criminal matters, including D.U.I., Drugs and Narcotics Charges, Traffic Violations, White Collar Crimes, Domestic Violence Crimes, Sexual Offenses, Misdemeanors, Serious Violent Crimes and Murder. With 25 years of experience, I have handled all of these types of cases. Every case is different and every set of facts is unique.
My office is located in downtown Waukegan, Lake County, Illinois across the street from the courthouse and I serve Northeastern Illinois in the area of criminal defense, I have successfully represented clients throughout the greater Chicago area.
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Reckless Homicide in Illinois

Reckless homicide is a criminal offense in the state of Illinois that involves causing the death of another person through reckless or negligent behavior. The punishment for this offense can vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case, but it is considered a serious crime and can result in significant prison time.

Reckless homicide is typically charged as a Class 3 felony, which carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison. However, if the victim was a peace officer or firefighter, the offense can be elevated to a Class 2 felony, which carries a maximum sentence of seven years in prison.

Examples of reckless behavior that could lead to a reckless homicide charge include driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, operating a vehicle at excessive speeds, or engaging in other dangerous activities that put the lives of others at risk.

It’s important to note that the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant’s actions were reckless, which means that the defendant was aware of the risk of harm and disregarded it.

Illinois also has an involuntary manslaughter statute, which is a less serious charge that can be applied in situations where the defendant did not intend to cause the death of the victim, but their actions were still negligent and caused the death.

If you are facing a reckless homicide charge, it is important to consult with a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible to discuss your options and develop a defense strategy.

Louis M. Pissios
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
a professional corporation
9 South County Street
across the street from the courthouse
Waukegan, Illinois 60085
direct email: [email protected]
_________________

Direct Telephone 847.263.0001

Illinois Criminal Defense

Illinois Criminal Defense
In the state of Illinois, criminal defense law is based on the principle that a person is innocent until proven guilty. This means that the prosecution must prove the guilt of the accused beyond a reasonable doubt in order for a conviction to occur.
Defendants have several rights under Illinois criminal defense law, including the right to legal representation, the right to remain silent, and the right to a fair trial. They also have the right to present evidence in their own defense and to confront witnesses against them.
If a person is charged with a crime, they may be eligible for bail, which allows them to be released from custody until their trial. If the defendant is unable to afford an attorney, one will be appointed to them by the court.
It’s also important to know that in Illinois, there are different types of criminal offenses, such as misdemeanors and felonies. Misdemeanors are less serious crimes that are punishable by less than one year in jail. Felonies are more serious crimes that are punishable by more than one year in prison.
Additionally, Illinois has a process called plea bargaining, in which the defendant agrees to plead guilty to a lesser charge in exchange for a reduced sentence.
Louis M. Pissios
Attorneys and Counselors at Law
a professional corporation
9 South County Street
across the street from the courthouse
Waukegan, Illinois 60085
direct email: [email protected]
_________________
Direct Telephone 847.263.0001

Continually Recognized for Our Successful Results

Continually Recognized for Our Successful Results

Continually Recognized for Our
Successful Results

The Law office of Louis M. Pissios has successfully handled many complex and high-profile cases in Illinois including everything from Driving Under the Influence Cases to Drug Cases to Murder Cases, and everything in between. We are in Lake County, Illinois and handle every case with the diligence necessary to get you the best results possible.

Our attorneys provide unparalleled legal representation to those who are facing serious criminal charges. We have extensive experience in all areas of Criminal Law. Our Firm has a reputation for providing top-notch, high quality representation.

We recognize that every person, and every criminal prosecution, is unique. We tailor our practice to the individual needs of each and every client. Our ethics, skill and knowledge will help you obtain the best possible results.

The lawyer you choose to represent you can affect the results of your case. Our legal defense team includes experienced private investigators, paralegals and translators. . We provide high quality, creative and thorough legal representation to each and every one of our clients. We are only as good as the results we obtain for our clients. Our greatest compliment comes from the fact that many of our former clients and other attorneys refer clients to us for representation.

You should not compromise your choice of an attorney. This may be one of the most important decisions that you ever make.

Lake County police departments looking to add body cameras

 

It’s not unusual for police officers to be filmed by people with cellphones during a traffic stop nowadays, but police throughout Lake County may be wearing body cameras to monitor interactions as soon as this fall in Round Lake Park, and other departments are not far behind.

From Round Lake Park to Round Lake and Mundelien to the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, municipalities and their police departments are moving ahead with body cameras.

“This is definitely the wave of the future and something that’s needed,” Lake County State’s Attorney Michael Nerheim said. “Body cameras are a type of evidence and the more evidence we have in any case the better.”

Gov. Bruce Rauner last week signed legislation that lays out the rules for police body cameras in Illinois, making it only the third state in the country to establish such rules, according to an Associated Press analysis. While it does not mandate body cameras, although there was legislation floated that would have done just that, it does specify how they will be worn, when they have to be turned on and how long the recordings must be kept as evidence.

It also established a grant program funded by a $5 addition to traffic tickets to help police departments buy the body cameras.

“They are going to be involved in every case, even misdemeanors,” Nerheim said. “You’re going to see footage on every single case.”

Nerheim said his office is working with the more than 40 police departments in Lake County on uniformity. If each department operated on a different system, that could pose a problem for his office, which would handle the recordings in court.

“It’s important we are part of the process,” he said.

Round Lake Park Police Chief George Filenko said if everything goes as planned his department will be ready to roll out the body cameras by mid September.

“It’s logical we’re doing this,” he said, “We decided this was the way to go.”

The village has purchased 6 4RE in-car systems with panoramic HD cameras and 13 VISTA HD body-worn cameras that have adjustable lenses so officers can adjust them according to their height. The total cost was approximately $57,000, which also includes a server and needed software.

For Patrol Officer Donna O’Brien, the body camera, which uses industrial strength magnets to hold it in place, is a good thing.

“I prefer them,” she said, “It’s good to have one more form of evidence to back up the truth.”

“I also think it’s good tool for training. I can review how I walked up to a vehicle during a traffic stop or person and see how I might of done it differently,” or see something that may have put her in danger, but she didn’t realize it at the time, she said.

“It will keep me on my toes, but I always act professionally,” she said.

Filenko said the response of his officers has not been “why do we need them,” but “when are we getting them.”

“In my opinion this is going to become standard, it may even be mandatory eventually,” he said. He knew two years ago they were going to need new squad car videos and he thought of incorporating the body cameras with that new system.

“It’s still not going to replace the human eye,” he said, but in the worse-case scenario, an officer involved shooting, “the more video the better,” said Filenko, who is in charge of the Major Crime Task Force that is called in to investigate those shootings.

Round Lake Police Chief Michael Gillette said his mayor and trustees wanted to get ahead of the curve and be pro-active. “I’m proud of the board and the mayor for letting us do that,” he said of their purchase of 15 FirstVu HD cameras from Kansas-based Digital Ally, at a cost of $13,800.

“We feel it’s a good tool for the officers to put together a solid case,” he said, “and of course it would be used in allegations of misconduct. I think they are really good tools.”

Bigger departments have bigger problems with figuring out the financing, but the Waukegan Police Department is “aggressively” researching different models, according to Cmdr. Joe Florip.

“We need to see what will work best (for the 80 patrol officers and 20 patrol cars). We’re excited as an organization to get body cameras. We think it’s best for our community and the police department,” he said.

“It’s priceless when it comes to a citizen complaint. There’s nothing like pulling up a video,” he said, noting that sometimes they can do that now from dash cameras and sometimes residents see their actions in a different light.

The Lake County Chiefs Association, headed by Highland Park Chief Paul Schafer, said they are getting more inquiries from other chiefs about body cameras. There still needs to be a lot of policy work, such as how to handle Freedom of Information requests, obscuring juvenile or witness faces from the video and other issues and having the personnel able to do that.

“There’s a lot of implementation with this new technology that the chiefs are taking a look at,” he said. They plan to have it on their agenda for the September meeting.

Other departments like Round Lake Beach are just starting to look into it, partly because of the funding mechanism included in the bill the governor recently signed. For some departments it would be hard to afford and they want to make sure they get the right equipment.

“We want it done right the first time,” said Police Chief Dave Hare. But he believes they will benefit police and the community.

“Transparency is a good thing for the community and body camera play into that,” he said

Illinois Supreme Court released 4 criminal law cases for March 2016.

 

Here are the top 13 criminal law cases from the Illinois court system for March 2016. The first 4 are from the Illinois Supreme Court. Number 4 was a victory for the defense at the lower level and the Illinois Supreme Court had something to say about that.

  1.  People v. Burns
    The “no-nights visits” rule is affirmed, can’t bring the sniffer dog to your front step for a little sniff action.
  2. People v. Bradford
    Prosecution no longer allowed to overcharge an ordinary retail theft to a burglary.
  3. People v. Clark
    Aggravated vehicular hijacking and armed robbery without a firearm are not lesser-included offenses of aggravated vehicular hijacking and armed robbery with a firearm.
  4. People v. Timmsen
    Apparently, the police can stop you for trying to legally avoid a roadblock.
  5. People v. Abram
    Officers approach defendant who was sitting in his car he then, to say the least, ensues in outright flight.
  6. People v. Smith
    This trial judge was overruled; there is nothing unconstitutional about requesting citizen’s to roll up their sleeves.
  7. People v. Thompson
    Some of the State’s remarks relied on questionable advocacy, but did not rise to the level of clear and obvious error.
  8. People v. Meuris
    In a leaving the scene of an accident prosecution the State must not only prove that Defendant knew he was involved in an accident but also that another person was involved.
  9. People v. Weinke
    Reviewing court says ASA exaggerated the severity of victim’s condition and misled the court as to the source and timing of her information in order to pressure the court into granting a quickie deposition.
  10. People v. Tayborn
    Trial counsel was ineffective for not challenging defendant’s confession given without Miranda warnings.
  11. People v. Little
    Cigarette break is not a sufficient amount of time to remove the taint of the original Miranda violation.
  12. People v. Gray
    These drug officers were themselves charged with distributing narcotics and Defendant was not told about the investigation before he plead guilty to his own drug charges.
  13. People v. Fulton
    In a charge of armed habitual criminal the same conviction can be used as one of the predicate offenses as well the predicate to the UUW Felony conviction that may be being used.

The Supreme Court Affirms Your Right to Hire a Lawyer of Your Choosing

Sila Luis says she didn’t do anything wrong. The United States government says she defrauded Medicare for millions of dollars through kickbacks and overbilling. Now the government is putting her on trial to answer for these serious criminal charges, and Luis wants to hire the best lawyer she can afford. One problem: The government has frozen all her assets, including those completely untainted by the alleged fraud.Luis says the asset freeze violates her Sixth Amendment right “to have the assistance of counsel for [her] defense.” The government said it doesn’t: She can still hire counsel; she just has to find one who’ll represent her for free.

On Wednesday, the Supreme Courtsided with Luis in an important victory for the Sixth Amendment—which could use a friend these days. In his plurality opinion, Justice Stephen Breyer reminded the government that the Assistance of Counsel Clause grants a defendant “a fair opportunity to secure counsel of his own choice.” (Emphasis mine.) Put differently, the Sixth Amendment shields a defendant’s “right to be represented by an otherwise qualified attorney whom that defendant can afford to hire.” The government “would undermine the value of that right by taking from Luis the ability to use the funds she needs to pay for her chosen attorney.” So Luis must be permitted to pay her preferred lawyer with untainted funds.

Breyer acknowledges that the government has a “contingent interest in securing its punishment of choice (namely, criminal forfeiture),” and that victims have an “interest in securing restitution.” But these interests do not “enjoy constitutional protection,” and, “compared to the right to counsel of choice, these interests would seem to lie somewhat further from the heart of a fair, effective criminal justice system.” Breyer’s opinion was joined by Chief Justice John Roberts, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Justice Clarence Thomas concurred with Breyer, but only in the judgment. Breyer, Roberts, and Sotomayor are surely pleased by Luis’ outcome: They dissented from a recent opinion which held that a criminal defendant indicted by a grand jury has virtually no right to challenge the forfeiture of her assets. Luisdoesn’t necessarily cut back on that decision, but it does send a clear message that the Sixth Amendment’s Assistance of Counsel provision remains robust.

In a separate opinion, Thomas criticized Breyer for implying that courts may sometimes balance a defendant’s interest in hiring counsel against the government’s interest in freezing assets. “The Sixth Amendment guarantees the right to counsel of choice,” Thomas explains. “As discussed, a pretrial freeze of untainted assets infringes that right. This conclusion leaves no room for balancing.”

The Sixth Amendment denies the Government unchecked power to freeze a defendant’s assets before trial simply to secure potential forfeiture upon conviction. If that bare expectancy of criminal punishment gave the Government such power, then a defendant’s right to counsel of choice would be meaningless, because retaining an attorney requires resources. … An unlimited power to freeze a defendant’s potentially forfeitable assets in advance of trial would eviscerate the Sixth Amendment’s original meaning and purpose.

For what it’s worth, I think Thomas is absolutely correct, although his separate concurrence drew no other justices. (Might Justice Antonin Scalia have joined it were he still alive?) Still, Sixth Amendment supporters should be pleased with the final outcome of the case. A government that can prevent a legally innocent person from hiring her preferred lawyer is a government unrestrained by the Sixth Amendment’s strictures. Make no mistake: Luis is a triumph for the right to counsel, at a time whenit is in desperate need of a win.